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10th Grade Literature and Composition : Research and MLA Review
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10th Lit Comp 17 10th Lit Comp Research MLA Review. Research and MLA Review. Key Terms The Writing Process Review The Research Process Rough Draft Review and Polishing Process Module Wrap Up Final Assessments

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Grade Literature and Composition : Shakespearean Drama
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10th Lit Comp 17 10th Lit Comp Shakespearean Drama. Shakespearean Drama. Introduction Key Terms Introduction to Drama Analyzing the Shakespearean Drama Reading the Shakespearean Drama Module WrapUp Final Assessments Introduction to William Shakespeare Analyzing the Shakespearean Drama Structure Analyzing the Shakespearean Drama Language

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Grade Literature and Composition : Short Stories Two
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10th Lit Comp 13 10th Lit Shortstory Twos. Short Stories Two. Introduction Plurals and Possessives Terms and Background Literature Assignments Review Final Assessments

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Grade Literature and Composition : Short Story One
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10th Lit Comp 10th Lit Short Story One. Short Story One. Introduction Active and Passive Voice Short Story Terms Literature Assignments Review Final Assessment continued Final Assessments

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Grade Literature and Composition : The Arthurian Legends
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10th Lit Comp 10 Lit Arthurian Legends. The Arthurian Legends. Introduction Subjective and Objective Case Pronouns Medieval Background and Terms Arthurian Literature Assignments Review Final Assessments Novel Research Project Submission

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Grade Literature and Composition : The Literary Analysis Essay
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10th Lit Comp 17 10th Grade Lit Comp Literary Analysis Essay. The Literary Analysis Essay. Introduction Key Terms Elements of Grammar Mechanics Argumentative and Informative Essay Types Review Elements of the Literary Analysis Essay The Structure of the Literary Analysis Module Wrap Up Final Assessments

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Grade Literature and Composition : Traditional Short Stories
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10th Lit Comp 17 10th Lit Comp Traditional Short Stories. Traditional Short Stories. Introduction Key Terms Short Story Review Literature and Analysis Review Entertaining Tales Historical Tales Module Wrapup Final Assessments

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Grade Literature and Composition : Traditions
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10th Lit Comp 10 Lit Traditions. Traditions. Introduction Subject Verb Agreement Fables Fairy Tales and Folklore Wisdom from Varying Cultures Assignments Review Final Assessments

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Grade Literature and Composotion : Nonfiction One
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10th Lit Comp 10th Lit Nonfiction One. Nonfiction One. Introduction P arallel Construction of Sentences Nonfiction Terms Nonfiction Reading Selections Assignments Final Assessment Review Final Assessments Parallel Construction of Sentences

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Literature and Composition : Informative and Argumentative Essays
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10th Lit Comp 17 10th Lit Comp Inform Argumentative Essays. Informative and Argumentative Essays. Introduction Key Terms Elements of Grammar Mechanics Proper Punctuation Elements of the Argumentative Essay Module Wrap Up Page Final Assessments

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
10th Literature and Composition : Short Stories Two
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10th Lit Comp 10th Lit Short Story Two. Short Stories Two. Introduction Plurals and Possessives Terms and Background Literature Assignments Review Final Assessments

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/01/2018
The 1980s Farm Crisis Collection
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This 90-minute film was produced by Iowa PBST Farm Crisis. This feaure examines the economic and personal disasters that afflicted the agriculture sector in the 1980s.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Date Added:
09/01/2022
45-45-90 and 30-60-90 Triangles
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The formulas for 45-45-90 and 30-60-90 triangles and the use of the Pythagorean theorem to prove the formulas.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Edward A. Zobel
Date Added:
12/01/2023
6.1 Greek Mythology
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Why do Greek myths continue to be relevant and popular today? In this module, students meet figures from ancient Greek mythology who are placed in a contemporary setting and evaluate how stories from a different time and place continue to resonate.

Students begin Unit 1 by launching their reading of The Lightning Thief. Students analyze how the author develops the point of view of the narrator, and then strategize to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases, including figurative language. In the second half of Unit 1, students prepare for a Socratic Seminar discussion by analyzing how Percy, the main character, responds to challenges. They create discussion norms to have productive text-based discourse about the novel. Theme is also introduced in the second half of the unit in preparation for Unit 2.

In Unit 2, students continue to read The Lightning Thief, some parts in class and others for homework. They analyze the Greek myths highlighted in the novel and compare themes and topics in the Greek myths with those evident in The Lightning Thief. In the second half of the unit, students write a literary analysis essay using the Painted Essay® structure, comparing and contrasting the treatment of events in the movie The Lightning Thief with the same events in the novel.

In Unit 3, students reimagine a scene from The Lightning Thief, writing themselves into the action as a different demigod from Camp Half-Blood. They research a Greek god of their choosing (or another traditional figure for those who don’t feel comfortable imagining themselves as a child of a Greek god) and use their research to create a new character, the child of that figure. Students develop the attributes of that character and strategically insert the character into a scene from the novel, editing carefully so as not to change the outcome of the story. At the end of the module, students create a presentation outlining their choices and reasoning for the performance task.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
05/17/2024
6.1 Light & Matter
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Why do we sometimes see different things when looking at the same object? How does a one-way mirror work? Though most everyone knows that one-way mirrors exist, having students model how they work turns out to be a very effective way to develop their thinking about how visible light travels and how we see images. Initial student models in this 6th grade light and matter science unit reveal a wide variety of ideas and explanations that motivate the unit investigations that help students figure out what is going on and lead them to a deeper understanding of the world around them.

OpenSciEd content is highly rated in EdReports and is aligned to NGSS standards.

Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
01/26/2024
6.2 Critical Problems and Design Solutions
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Design thinking makes clear the systematic process that allows innovators to learn and apply techniques to solve critical problems in a creative way. In Module 2, students read the true story of William Kamkwamba in The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind (Young Readers edition) and how he used design thinking to confront the devastating effects of famine in his country, Malawi. In response to this seemingly insurmountable problem, William spent countless hours in the local library, reading science textbooks and searching for a possible solution. Through careful research, and after many rounds of trial and error, William used available materials and scraps from the local junkyard to construct a windmill that brought electricity to his community, allowing kids to study into the evening, adults to recharge their mobile phones, and water pumps to irrigate the fields and produce more abundant harvests. Propelled by unshakable perseverance, a keen awareness of his community’s needs, and compassion for those suffering around him, William models how innovative thinkers can leverage design thinking to address critical problems in their own communities. Inspired by this concept, students work towards a performance task in which they research and present another innovative solution designed to address a critical issue. For this Solution Symposium, students interact with their audience to explain how design thinking and habits of character led to the development of a successful solution.

In Unit 1, students read the first nine chapters of the anchor text, building background on William Kamkwamba and the problems William’s community faced in rural Malawi, in a village with limited resources and access to education. Through two Language Dives using key sentences in the anchor text and a close read of a supplemental text, students practice identifying the central idea, citing textual evidence, analyzing how individual sentences contribute to the development of a text’s central ideas, and determining the meaning of words and phrases in a text.

In Unit 2, students finish reading the text, and demonstrate their continued reading-skill development in the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, which uses an excerpt from the text to assess students’ abilities to interpret the figurative and connotative meanings of unfamiliar words, analyze information portrayed in various media formats, and explain how a small portion of a text contributes to the central idea. By clearly delineating the many problems William faced, students see how each was addressed through science, research, and habits of character, like perseverance. With the support of explicit mini lessons on research skills, students then begin independent research on an innovator who, like William, designed a product to solve a critical problem. These research skills are assessed in the End of Unit 2 Assessment.

Through writing a collaborative informational essay about William in the first half of Unit 3, students deepen their understanding of the design thinking process and explore how William Kamkwamba used this process to solve a problem. The unit builds towards the performance task, a Solution Symposium, at which students present and share interactive displays of their research on an innovative solution to a critical problem. The Solution Symposium engages audience members in a conversation in which the student shares his or her answers to the following questions: (1) how was design thinking used to solve this problem and (2) how were habits of character used to solve this problem? Following the symposium, as the End of Unit 3 Assessment, students will collaborate to discuss how habits of character help people like those featured in their research solve critical problems.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
05/17/2024
6.2 Thermal Energy
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How can containers keep stuff from warming up or cooling down? What keeps different cups or containers from warming up or cooling down? Students begin this 6th grade science unit by experimenting whether a new plastic cup sold by a store keeps a drink colder for longer than the regular plastic cup that comes free with the drink. Students find that the drink in the regular cup warms up more than the drink in the special cup. This prompts students to identify features of the cups that are different, such as the lid, walls, and hole for the straw, that might explain why one drink warms up more than the other.

OpenSciEd content is highly rated in EdReports and is aligned to NGSS standards.

Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
01/26/2024
6.3 American Indian Boarding Schools
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Despite their painful and long-lasting impact, American Indian boarding schools are an often neglected topic of study. In Module 3, students are introduced to this topic, with the goal of amplifying long unheard voices and better understanding this critical time in North American history. Students read Two Roads, the story of a thoughtful and independent boy named Cal and his father “Pop,” who live as traveling “knights of the road” after losing their farm during the Great Depression. Cal faces a critical question of identity when he learns from Pop that, after a lifetime of identifying as white, he is, in fact, part Creek Indian. Cal’s father shares this revelation days before enrolling Cal at the Challagi Indian Industrial School while he travels to Washington, DC alone. Cal challenges the expectations of the school’s administration, develops close friendships with other students, and questions, explores, evaluates, and affirms his varying identities. To deepen their understanding of American Indian boarding schools beyond a literary context, students also read a variety of supplemental texts, including informational reports and first-person accounts of life at American Indian boarding schools. Together, these texts further contextualize the anchor text and illustrate a wider range of experiences.

In Unit 1, students read excerpts of the initial chapters of the anchor text, which serves as a “hook,” inciting student interest in the history of American Indian boarding schools. Students then develop their knowledge of the historical context of the topic by reading related informational and narrative supplemental texts. Students consider the purported objectives of American Indian boarding schools and compare these against the often far darker experiences reported by the students who attended these schools. Students then return to the anchor text at chapter 9, better equipped to contextualize the experiences of Cal, Pop, and Cal’s friends. Unit 1 assessments gauge students’ abilities to read critically and independently for the author’s point of view and for background information on the topic.

In Unit 2, students finish reading the anchor text. They demonstrate continued development of reading skills, tracking character growth and central ideas and themes in the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment using a new excerpt from the text. An additional supplemental text is included in Unit 2 to support connections across the anchor text and the historical context. At the end of the novel, Cal faces the decision of returning to Challagi school or staying with his father in Washington, DC. Students convey Cal’s vacillating perspective toward this challenging question through a narrative letter to Possum, focusing on just one of the possible outcomes. This narrative assignment, which has the option of being assessed for its appropriate and accurate use of pronouns and sentence variety (a second assessment targeting these skills is also available), helps prepare students for the argument essay of Unit 3. Some of the evidence and reasoning incorporated into these student narratives will be repurposed and strengthened in an argument essay for the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment.

In Unit 3, students revisit the Painted Essay® structure as they construct their own argument essays. In those essays, they grapple with the question of whether Cal should return to the boarding school or remain with his father, whom he has run away to find. Students first collaboratively produce an argument piece using a similar prompt to further prepare for their independent argument essays. Module 3’s performance task presents the culmination of students’ learning about and reflections on the American Indian boarding schools through the production of an audio museum exhibit. Students select an excerpt from a text written by a survivor of American Indian boarding schools; they then write a preface to situate their text within a historical context and a reflection to convey the personal impact felt by their chosen text. Students record their preface, text, and reflection independently, and then use an audio recording application program to produce a product that will be featured at a listening station as part of the audio museum and can be widely shared to uplift the voices of American Indian boarding schools.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
05/17/2024
6.3 Weather, Climate & Water Cycling
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Why does a lot of hail, rain, or snow fall at some times and not others? This 6th grade science unit on weather, climate, and water cycling is broken into four separate lesson sets. In the first two lesson sets, students explain small-scale storms. In the third and fourth lesson sets, students explain mesoscale weather systems and climate-level patterns of precipitation. Each of these two parts of the unit is grounded in a different anchoring phenomenon.

OpenSciEd content is highly rated in EdReports and is aligned to NGSS standards.

Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
01/26/2024
6.4 Plate Tectonics & Rock Cycling
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What causes Earth's surface to change? Mountains move! And there are ocean fossils on top of Mt. Everest! In this plate tectonics and rock cycling unit, students come to see that the Earth is much more active and alive than they have thought before. The unit launches with documentation of a 2015 Himalayan earthquake that shifted Mt. Everest suddenly to the southwest direction. Students also discover that Mt. Everest is steadily moving to the northeast every year and getting taller as well. Students wonder what could cause an entire mountain to move during an earthquake.

OpenSciEd content is highly rated in EdReports and is aligned to NGSS standards.

Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
OpenSciEd
Date Added:
01/26/2024