Collecting & Organizing Data

Collecting & Organizing Data

List of Questions

Opening

List of Questions

Look at the list of questions.

Today you will collect data for each question. First you will collect data about yourself, and then the class will combine the collected data.

  • As you collect the data, think about where you might fit into the overall class data for each question. For which categories do you think you match the typical characteristics for a sixth grade student?
  • Discuss with your partner how you could collect data for each question and why it is important that everyone in the class collects data in the same way.

Math Mission

Opening

Collect data that you will use to help define the characteristics of a typical sixth grade student.

Collect Data

Work Time

Collect Data

Work with a partner to answer all of the questions. Enter your data in your Notebook. Be careful to measure as accurately as possible. For the second question, record the best of three tries.

  • How tall are you (to the nearest inch)?
  • How far can you jump (to the nearest inch)?
  • How high can you reach (to the nearest inch)?
  • How long is your foot (to the nearest half inch)?
  • How many hours a week do you watch television?
  • How many letters are in your first name?
  • Write and answer your own question.

Add the data you collected to the class data as directed by your teacher.

Hint:

Remember that it is important that everyone in the class collects the data in the same way. Ask your teacher if you are not sure how to find or record the data for a question.

What is Typical?

Work Time

What is Typical?

In future lessons you will use the data that the class collected to determine what is typical for a sixth grade student for each question. However, the way that you determine what is typical may differ, depending on the question.

Look back at the list of questions and the data you and the class collected.

  • Do you think it will be easier to decide what is typical for some questions versus other questions?
  • If so, for which questions do you think it will be easier?
  • For which questions do you think it will be more difficult? Why?
  • Discuss your thinking with a partner.

Prepare a Presentation

Work Time

Prepare a Presentation

  • Prepare a presentation that explains how you made your measurements and how you chose your own question.

Challenge Problem

  • If every single person in the class has a different arm span, how could you determine what the typical arm span is?

Make Connections

Performance Task

Ways of Thinking: Make Connections

Take notes about:

  • The ways that your classmates made their measurements. How do their methods compare to your methods?
  • Your classmates’ ideas about for which questions it will be easier or more difficult to determine what is typical. How do their ideas compare to yours?

Hint:

As your classmates present, ask questions such as:

  • How did you take a measurement to answer the question?
  • Do you think it will be easy or difficult to determine what is typical for this question? Why do you think so?

Collecting Data

Formative Assessment

Summary of the Math: Collecting Data

Write a summary of what you learned about collecting data.

Hint:

Check your summary.

  • Did you give reasons for why it is important to collect data accurately and in a consistent way?

Reflect on Your Work

Work Time

Reflection

Write a reflection about the ideas discussed in class today. Use the sentence starters below if you find them to be helpful.

What I learned about collecting data is …

I would like to find the answer to the statistical question …