Author:
INFOhio Central
Subject:
Information, Media and Technological Literacy, Communication, Arts and Communication, English Language Arts, Writing, Writing for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects
Material Type:
Lesson, Module
Level:
High School
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Provider:
INFOhio
Tags:
  • Information Literacy
  • Inquiry
  • Inquiry Skills
  • Research
  • Research Process
  • Research Skills
  • Research Topic
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML, Video

    Practice Developing Research Questions

    Practice Developing Research Questions

    Overview

     Use the materials in this lesson to practice developing a research topic.

    Introduction

    Teacher Tip

    Be proactive and stop plagiarism problems before they start! Read Michelle Cleary's Phi Delta Kappen article, Top 10 Reasons Students Plagiarize and What Teachers Can Do About It.

    A topic is the starting point for your research. When you have chosen a broad topic, the next step is to create a research question about your topic. There will be more than one question you can use for every topic. Your question can be modified and even replaced as you learn more about the topic. The most workable research questions usually start with "Why," "How," "Which," "Should," or "What if."

    Practice Evaluating Research Questions

    Essential questions drive research and inquiry. See how quickly you can sort out essential questions from topics and simple questions.

     gameReview topics, simple questions, and research questions with this Questioning Game linked below. Drag and drop each card into the correct vortex: Topic, Simple Question, or Essential Question. See if you can post a personal best, or race your friends up the leaderboard. 

    Question Game

     

    Practice Brainstorming Questions to Guide Research

    Practice brainstorming questions to guide research using this sample article below. 

    read a webpage or articleRead the article How to Fix Social Media Before It's Too Late: An Early Investor on How Facebook Lost Its Way by Roger McNamee. Use the 3 Levels of Questions Word document or PDF linked below. Develop sample research questions based on your reading of the article. You can apply this questioning technique to future research projects or to find a solution to a problem. 

    Here are some sample questions based on the article to help you get started.

    • Question directly from the text:
      • How many people use Facebook every day?
    • Question implied in the text:
      • What role does "growth hacking" play in Facebook's advertising business?
    • Question that takes your research deeper:
      • How can monopoly regulations on social media companies reduce harmful behavior on social media?

       

      Practice Developing Research Questions

      When you have chosen a broad topic, the next step is to do a little research into the topic so you know you have enough to create a research question. Your question can be modified and even replaced as you learn more about the topic.

      The most workable research questions usually start with "Why?", "How?", "Which?", "Should?", or "What if?" 

      formPractice developing questions to guide research by filling in the blanks on the Developing Your Questions Word Document or PDF linked below. As you fill in the blanks, think about the new question as a research topic. 

      Need some help? Check out the examples below.

      1. Should schools monitor your social media accounts?

      2. Should the Supreme Court be expanded?

      3. How have efforts of reform impacted climate change?