Social Studies

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Art, Commentary and Evidence: Analysis of "The White Man's Burden"
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In this activity students analyze Kipling's famous poem about imperialism and read several poems that were written in response to it. Students discuss how effective the poems are as art, political commentary, and historical evidence.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Comparing Slaves and Servants in Colonial New York
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In this activity students read a list of laws regulating Africans and African Americans and a servant's indenture contract from colonial New York. Then students find evidence in the primary sources to support a series of statements about the differences between slaves and servants in the period. This activity includes scaffolds and vocabulary support for students with literacy challenges.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Decoding U.S. Foreign Policy: The Iran-Contra Affair
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In this activity students analyze a timeline and official and unofficial documents that reveal the events of the Iran-Contra Affair. This activity also models the types of questions that can help students analyze foreign policy documents from other events. The activity instructions include suggestions for how to differentiate the activity for students with different reading levels.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Digital Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
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Educational Use
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Geographic information systems (GIS), once used predominantly by experts in cartography and computer programming, have become pervasive in everyday business and consumer use. This unit explores GIS in general as a technology about which much more can be learned, and it also explores applications of that technology. Students experience GIS technology through the use of Google Earth on the environmental topic of plastics in the ocean in an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The use of this topic in GIS makes the unit multidisciplinary, incorporating the physics of ocean currents, the chemistry associated with pollutant degradation and chemical sorption to organic-rich plastics, and ecological impact to aquatic biota.

Subject:
Engineering
Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Andrey Koptelov
Nathan Howell
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Diplomacy
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Students grasp the nuances of diplomacy through this interactive lesson. They are called to decide which diplomacy tools work best in different situations. Students will develop an understanding of negotiation, sanctions, and other elements used in diplomatic relationships. LESSON OBJECTIVES: Define foreign policy. *Distinguish between isolationism and internationalism. *Explain the relationship between the national interest and U.S. foreign policy. *Explain the role of the three branches of government in foreign policy. *Make judgments about the effectiveness of various diplomatic strategies in a variety of situations. *Distinguish between aid, sanctions, and military force as foreign policy tools.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022
"In Defense of My Race and Country": African-American Soldiers on Why They Are Fighting
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In this activity students read three letters written by African-American soldiers during the Civil War to determine why black soldiers felt compelled to join the Union Army.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
International Influence
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Economic, cultural, and military influence are all critical in developing spheres of influence. Students explore international authority by following a Cold War case study, which will encourage better understanding of international persuasion. LESSON OBJECTIVES: Identify the following key terms: sphere of influence, containment, capitalism, communism, propaganda, Truman Doctrine, Cold War, NATO, Warsaw Pact, and Marshall Plan. *Describe times that the U.S. has been influenced or has influenced other sovereign nations. *Explain the tension between western and eastern allies during the Cold War. *Evaluate the effect of economic, military, and cultural influence on other nations.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022
Lessons from Antiquity
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Teach your students about democracy with examples from the very beginning! In this lesson, students learn about Athens's direct democracy and Rome's republic. Students explore how these governments took shape and key features of their structure, and then try their hands at comparing and contrasting each to U.S. government today. LESSON OBJECTIVES: Describe democracy in Athens and Rome *Differentiate between democracy and other forms of government *Identify characteristics of direct and representative democracy *Compare and contrast democracy in Athens and Rome to the U.S. government today *Analyze arguments against democracy

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022
Lessons in Looking: Contraband in Paintings
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In this activity students analyze Theodor Kaufmann's 1867 painting On to Liberty. Students practice finding information and making inferences based on the painting by completing a graphic organizer. Then students read a descriptive paragraph of the painting, noting where the author has cited information from the painting and where the author has made inferences and drawn conclusions. Then students analyze another painting of a similar theme, Eastman Johnson's A Ride for Liberty. The activity concludes by asking students to synthesize what they have learned about the Civil War based on the painting. The activity may make a good culminating lesson about the Civil War or an introductory lesson on Reconstruction.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Liberty for All: Voices from the Revolution
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In this activity students read short excerpts of documents that show how the expectations of women, African Americans, and working white men were raised by the rhetoric of liberty during the American Revolution. Students write petitions to the Continental Congress from one of the three group's perspectives, explaining how their group responded to the Revolution and outlining how their group should be treated under the new Constitution. This activity includes multiple learning supports that can help ESL/ELL students, special education students, or low readers.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Nos creemos americanos: Braceros in History and Song
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In this activity students write original corridos(a type of Mexican folk song) based on the oral histories of braceros. Before writing their own corridos, students learn about the formulas and themes of corridosand analyze a World War II-era corrido. This lesson works best if students have basic background information on the bracero program.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Not so Fast, Mr. President!: Examining American Opposition to Involvement in World War I
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In this lesson, students will be examining primary sources pertaining to differing viewpoints of America's involvement in World War I. The students will annotate the documents, looking for main ideas and supporting details. The students will then form graphic organizers separating two opposing viewpoints. Finally, students will write a group expository essay using the data from the graphic organizer. This lesson was created as part of the Alabama Bicentennial Commission's Curriculum Development Project.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Alabama Learning Exchange (ALEX)
Date Added:
02/10/2021
A Raisin in the Sun: Whose "American Dream"?
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Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun provides a compelling and honest look into one family's aspirations to move to another Chicago neighborhood and the thunderous crash of a reality that raises questions about for whom the "American Dream" is accessible.

Subject:
Arts
Literature
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
11/19/2020
Rev. Frank Dukes: Selective Buying Campaign
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Educational Use
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In this oral history from the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, Frank Dukes describes his role in the 1962 boycott of discriminatory stores and businesses.

Subject:
American History
Economics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Author:
Birmingham Civil Rights Institute
Institute of Museum and Library Services
Washington University in St. Louis
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
05/06/2004
Supporting Claims with Evidence: The Second Amendment and Gun Control Debates
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In this activity, students develop Common Core reading skills (eg. citing textual evidence, determining the central ideas, and determining meaning of words and phrases) through a study of the history of the second amendment to the U.S. Constitution and its significance today. First, students work independently, with some class discussion, to complete a close reading of the second amendment text and related primary and secondary documents. Then, students work in groups to prepare a presidential candidate for a debate in which he/she must defend a particular position, or claim, about the meaning of the second amendment and constitutionality of gun regulation.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Technological Turning Points and their Impact
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In this activity, students will look at images of various types of technology (eg. TV, video games, subway) and determine which ones are “technological turning points.” To help evaluate whether or not something is a “technological turning point,” students will complete a worksheet that identifies each technology's economic, social, environmental, and political effects. Students will also think about the positive and negative impact of technological change, including who benefits and does not benefit.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Telling the Whole Story: Irish Americans in Five Points
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In this activity students gather and analyze data from the 1855 census of the Five Points neighborhood. Students compare stereotypes of Irish immigrants with evidence from the census. Then students compare their census research with other primary sources describing life in Five Points to conclude how accurate different types of sources about urban immigrant life are. Students will need access to the internet to complete this activity.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Two Views of the Slave Ship Brookes
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In this activity students compare an eighteenth-century print of a slave ship and a table of data about the voyages of the slave ship to draw facts and make inferences about the transatlantic slave trade. This activity was designed for the Smartboard, but it can be completed without a Smartboard.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021