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Active Viewing: 1877: The Grand Army of Starvation
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In this activity, students watch a short clip from the ASHP documentary 1877: The Grand Army of Starvationto learn about the impact of railroad expansion on Americans and the nation as a whole. After watching the clip, students complete the “Technological Turning Points and their Impact” worksheet in order to examine the positive and negative effects of the railroad.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Active Viewing: Daughters of Free Men
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In this activity, students watch short clips of the ASHP documentary Daughters of Free Mento learn about the experiences of Lowell mill girls in the 1830s. Students follow the life of Lucy, a young girl working in Lowell in 1836. After each clip, students reflect on what they have just learned and predict what Lucy will do next.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Active Viewing: Eyes on the Prize "Awakenings"
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In this activity students analyze the reasons why the Montgomery Bus Boycott lasted so long and was successful. Students watch a short clip from the PBS documentary Eyes on the Prizeabout the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Then students analyze primary sources to determine who participated in the boycott, who organized it, and what challenges boycott supporters faced. The teacher will need access to the filmEyes on the Prize, which is widely available in school and public libraries.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Active Viewing: Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl
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In this activity, students watch the documentary Heaven Will Protect the Working Girlin sections, with documents and exercises designed to support and reinforce the film's key concepts: workers challenging the effects of industrial capitalism, the impact on immigrant families of young women earning money in the garment industry, and the methods used by women to improve working conditions in factories during the Progressive Era.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Active Viewing: Savage Acts
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This activity is designed to help students understand key ideas from the documentary film Savage Acts: Wars, Fairs, and Empire 1898-1904. The film is divided into short segments with suggested viewing strategies and questions to keep students focused.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
American Politics Group Data Projects
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SETUPS (Empirical Teaching Unites in Political Science) data, published by the American Political Science Association, will be employed in group data analysis projects in an American Government class. Students then use results from these reports in composing an essay question on the course's final exam.

Subject:
Government
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Steven Schier
Date Added:
02/24/2021
Analyzing Data on American Political Divisions
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Students conducted data analysis about American political divisions and created two papers from this data analysis. Sutdents were assigned to group projects involving data analysis assigned chapters in MICROCASE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT, a textbook that includes access to a variety of datasets.

Subject:
Government
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Steven Schier
Date Added:
02/24/2021
Appellate Courts: Let's Take It Up
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Educational Use
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Students learn the purpose of appellate-level courts and how those courts operate differently from the trial courts most people are familiar with from watching television. By following the case of a real middle school girl who was strip searched at school, students find out what happens when someone takes a case all the way to the Supreme Court. Through this case, students learn about the structure of the federal court system and the way appellate courts decide cases.
LESSON OBJECTIVES: Explain the purpose of the appellate courts. *Describe how appellate courts work. *Compare the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court. *Define the following terms: precedent, opinion, dissent, brief, oral argument, en banc, petition.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022
Applying Lessons Learned to the Volcanic Risk at Mt. Rainier
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In this jigsaw-method activity on subduction zone volcanism, students apply lessons learned from four historic eruptions to the volcanic hazards associated with Mt. Rainier in the Pacific Northwest.

Subject:
Earth and Space Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Laurel Goodell
Date Added:
02/24/2021
Art, Commentary and Evidence: Analysis of "The White Man's Burden"
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In this activity students analyze Kipling's famous poem about imperialism and read several poems that were written in response to it. Students discuss how effective the poems are as art, political commentary, and historical evidence.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
The Candle Icebreaker
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Rating

Small groups of students examine a candle to consider its chemical properties. Class discussion follows to consider macro vs. molecular events, energy, phase changes, etc.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Dave Blackburn
Date Added:
02/24/2021
Claiming We the People: Political Participation in Revolutionary America
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In this activity students will learn about how groups without political power—African Americans, women, and working-class men—sought to expand their political power in the Revolutionary era. Students will analyze primary sources to determine the methods by which non-voting groups made their claims on being part of "We the People".

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
A Country within a Country: Understanding San Francisco's Chinatown
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In this activity, students use a range of primary and secondary sources about San Francisco's Chinatown (1880s-1920) to explore what the community meant to residents and to outsiders.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Create a Magic Lantern Show: Freedpeople in the Reconstruction South
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In this activity students create a "magic lantern show," or presentation that illustrates how African American defined freedom for themselves after emancipation and the challenges and threats they faced. Students use primary sources from the Reconstruction period. This activity can accompany a viewing of the filmDr. Toer's Amazing Magic Lantern Show: A Different View of Emancipation.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Create a Walking Tour of San Francisco's Chinatown
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In this activity students learn about the people and places, and the social rules that governed them, in San Francisco's Chinatown in the 1800s. Students develop a character based on the real people who lived in Chinatown, and then create a walking tour of what life was really like in "their" neighborhood. Students analyze photographs and read short background texts to gather information for their tours.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Creating a Cartoon of the Philippine-American War
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In this activity students create a political cartoon about one of five key historical understandings of the Philippine-American War. This activity and its materials are Smartboard-friendly but can be completed without a Smartboard. This activity is designed to accompany the film Savage Acts: Wars, Fairs, and Empire 1898-1904, but it can be adapted if the teacher does not have access to the film. To plan their cartoons, students will need scissors and glue or tape.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Debate: Should the U.S. Annex the Philippines?
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In this activity students investigate various perspectives on the debate over the annexation of the Philippines by the United States after the Spanish-American War. Students read a variety of primary sources on the annexation question and the struggle for Philippine independence, debate the relevant issues while in character of proponents of either side, attempt to reach consensus on the issue, and report the outcome to the class.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Debating Immigration Restriction: The Ellis Island Era
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In this activity, students consider arguments for and against unrestricted immigration during the Ellis Island era. Students analyze political cartoons, letters, newspaper articles, posters, and other sources, noting evidence in the documents to support the viewpoints of the various figures in the 1903 cartoon "The Immigrant." This activity also includes modifications for low-level readers.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Decoding U.S. Foreign Policy: The Iran-Contra Affair
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In this activity students analyze a timeline and official and unofficial documents that reveal the events of the Iran-Contra Affair. This activity also models the types of questions that can help students analyze foreign policy documents from other events. The activity instructions include suggestions for how to differentiate the activity for students with different reading levels.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
A Dive Into Democracy
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Take a close look at the structure of Athenian democracy and how it influenced the U.S. government. In this lesson, students explore the democratic ideals and practices of the ancient Greeks and search for evidence of them in the U.S. Constitution. LESSON OBJECTIVES: Identify political institutions and principles in ancient Athenian democracy *Explain the organization of Athenian democracy and the importance of citizenship *Analyze the purpose, strengths, and shortcomings in the rules and structure of Athenian democracy *Discover aspects of Athenian democracy found in the U.S. Constitution

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022
English Language Arts, Grade 11
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
03/04/2021
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers
Rating

In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Evaluating and Responding, Peer Response Groups
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In this lesson, students will meet with their writing group to edit their papers. They'll learn the protocols and routines for responding to classmates' writing, and they will make a plan for revising their paper.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Chris Adcock
Date Added:
03/04/2021
Exploring the Irish in America Through Found Poetry
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In this lesson students read poems and letters that describe the work and lives of nineteenth-century Irish immigrants to the United States. As students read the documents, they choose words and phrases to create found poems that reflect their understandings of the Irish-American experience.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
FDR's Tree Army: Personal Turning Points in the CCC
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In this activity students learn about the goals of the Civilian Conservation Corps and the opportunities it provided for young men. Students create poster presentations about different aspects of the CCC by combining photographs and quotes from primary sources. Students will need poster-making supplies (including poster board or paper, markers, scissors, and glue/markers).

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Forty Acres? The Question of Land at the War's End
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In this activity students consider different viewpoints on whether former slaves should be given land at the end of the Civil War. Students read one of five primary sources and summarize the author's viewpoint. This activity makes a good introduction to a unit on Reconstruction or to sum up a unit on the Civil War. This activity was designed to help students with language processing challenges synthesize historical documents.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
Foundation Basics
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Educational Use
Rating

What's the relationship between government and power? And how do the concepts of authority, legitimacy, and sovereignty influence that relationship? In this lesson, students are introduced to these key characteristics of government, consider how governments establish and maintain them, and analyze government forms to determine if and how each characteristic exists. LESSON OBJECTIVES: Explain how governments get their power, authority, legitimacy, and sovereignty *Analyze governments for key characteristics *Describe the relationships power, authority, legitimacy, and sovereignty share *Consider a government's legitimacy

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022
A "Great Cause for Better Citizens"? Attitudes Towards the New Deal
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In this activity students read letters from ordinary people to government leaders in the Roosevelt Administration. Then they interpret the range of attitudes about the changing role of the federal government during the New Deal. The letters for this activity all contain reading supports and teachers can differentiate this activity for different levels of learners by choosing which letters to use in the activity.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
How is History Recorded? The Lewis and Clark Journals and Lakota Winter Counts
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In this activity, students read two primary documents from the early 1800s: a journal entry from the Lewis and Clark expedition and a Lakota Indian "winter count" calendar. Using an analysis worksheet, students identify key ideas and details from the documents, while also examining the craft and structure of each document. They draw upon both the content and form of the documents to make inferences about the respective cultures of Euro-Americans and Native Americans in the early 1800s.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
"In Defense of My Race and Country": African-American Soldiers on Why They Are Fighting
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In this activity students read three letters written by African-American soldiers during the Civil War to determine why black soldiers felt compelled to join the Union Army.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
International Organizations
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Educational Use
Rating

Students compare the basic structure of several different international organizations before categorizing their work. Students also examine the local and global impact of international organizations. LESSON OBJECTIVES: Identify the purposes and functions of international organizations. *Describe the purposes and functions of the following international organizations: UN, EU, NATO, World Bank, Red Cross/Crescent, and World Health Organization. *Analyze the impact that international organizations can have on the lives of individuals.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022
Investigating Motors and Magnetism
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This activity is an activity where students build a motor, learn motor operation and theory, interpret their understanding through troubleshooting, and develop a new, experimental question related to the motor. One follow-up activity would be coupling their motor to a fan blade or other axle to convert electrical energy to magnetic energy into mechanical motion for real world application.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
David Reierson
Date Added:
02/24/2021
The Iron Horse vs. the Buffalo: Indian-Settler Conflict on the Great Plains
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In this activity, students read a series of primary source documents, including the 1872 print "American Progress," that depict the social, political and cultural conflicts between settlers and Native Americans during the 19th century. Then, working in small groups, students will consider the events from the perspective of Native Americans, and create an illustration to counter George A. Crofutt's famous print of "American Progress" moving across the Great Plains.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
02/17/2021
James Bond in a Honda: Trial Simulation Lesson
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Educational Use
Rating

Students participate in a scripted fictional trial based on a real case in which the producers of James Bond films sued Honda for creating an ad that looked way too much like a James Bond movie. After the "trial," students examine evidence and play the role of jurors. Students apply real copyright law to simulate the process courts use in applying law to fact and arrive at a "verdict." This is a two-day mock trial lesson.
LESSON OBJECTIVES: Simulate participation in a trial by reading a script. *Identify the major components and players in a trial. *Simulate jury deliberation by applying real laws to the facts in the trial in order to reach a verdict. *Evaluate the arguments of both sides in a trial.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022
Le Parcours de la biodiversit��: A Jigsaw Activity on Biodiversity
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In this jigsaw activity, students of intermediate-level French will divide into five groups to become experts on each of the five biodiversity questions featured on the Curiosphere website. They will proceed to explain their assigned aspect of the issue to a small group of students.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Laura Franklin
Date Added:
02/24/2021
Lessons from Antiquity
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Educational Use
Rating

Teach your students about democracy with examples from the very beginning! In this lesson, students learn about Athens's direct democracy and Rome's republic. Students explore how these governments took shape and key features of their structure, and then try their hands at comparing and contrasting each to U.S. government today. LESSON OBJECTIVES: Describe democracy in Athens and Rome *Differentiate between democracy and other forms of government *Identify characteristics of direct and representative democracy *Compare and contrast democracy in Athens and Rome to the U.S. government today *Analyze arguments against democracy

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
iCivics
Date Added:
03/25/2022