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  • American History
Boomtimes Again: Twentieth-Century Mining in the Mojave Desert
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore twentieth-century mining in the Mojave Desert. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Border Walls
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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This inquiry examines the 20th century history of migration from Mexico to the United States and recent efforts to limit the movement of people across the southern U.S. border. The inquiry takes its inspiration from a 2018 podcast episode by Malcom Gladwell titled, “General Chapman’s Last Stand.” The podcast is part of Gladwell’s Revisionist History series (http://revisionisthistory.com). In the podcast, Gladwell tells the story of General Leonard F. Chapman Jr., Commandant of the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War, who went on to serve as the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) from 1972 to 1975. Chapman is credited with reforming the INS into a more efficient and effective agency, but Gladwell argues that Chapman’s efforts also led to an unintentional increase in unauthorized immigrants. In 1970, 760,000 Mexican immigrants, or 1.4% of Mexico’s population, lived in the U.S. By 2008, there were 12.7 million Mexican immigrants in the U.S. which amounted to 11% of all people born in Mexico; an increase of almost 800% in less than 30 years. The question of how and why this happened is the central focus of this inquiry.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
02/12/2021
The Boston Sports Temples
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Boston Sports Temples celebrates the rich histories of BostonåÕs professional stadiums and arenas. Some, like Fenway Park, still welcome fans today. Others were demolished decades ago, leaving only hints of their former glory amid the urban landscape. This exhibition welcomes modern fans through the gates of venues both famous and forgotten: the various home fieldsåÑand courts and tracks and iceåÑof BostonåÕs most beloved franchises and hosts to a century of public events, concerts, and gatherings. Featuring historical photographs from the Boston Public LibraryåÕs extensive archives, Boston Sports Temples draws from thousands of negatives and prints dating from the early twentieth century through the 1960s. The images capture the unique character of BostonåÕs historic sports venues, memorable moments, and the communities of athletes, fans, and staff who have come together within their walls. Together, these vintage materials provide an invaluable window into the past and a nostalgic look back at our city, our deep sporting traditions, and generations of passionate fandom. Created by the Boston Public Library.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
The Boston Tea Party
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This collection uses primary sources to explore the Boston Tea Party. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Boy with a Squirrel
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This art history video discussion examines John Singleton Copley's "A Boy with a Flying Squirrel" (Henry Pelham), 1765, 77.15 x 63.82 cm / 30-3/8 x 25-1/8 inches (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston).

Khan Academy learning modules include a Community space where users can ask questions and seek help from community members. Educators should consult with their Technology administrators to determine the use of Khan Academy learning modules in their classroom. Please review materials from external sites before sharing with students.

Subject:
American History
Arts
History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
11/17/2020
Bread and Roses Strike of 1912: Two Months in Lawrence, Massachusetts, that Changed Labor History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

The Lawrence Textile Strike was a public protest mainly of immigrant workers from several countries, including Austria, Belgium, Cuba, Canada, France, England, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Syria, and Turkey. According to the 1910 census, 65% of mill workers (many of whom eventually struck) lived in the United States for less than 10 years; 47% for less than five years. Prompted by a wage cut, the walkout spread quickly from mill to mill across the city. Strikers defied the assumptions of conservative trade unions within the American Federation of Labor that immigrant, largely female and ethnically diverse workers could not be organized. The Lawrence strike is referred to as the åÒBread and RosesåÓ strike and åÒThe Strike for Three Loaves." The first known source to do so was a 1916 labor anthology, The Cry for Justice: An Anthology of the Literature of Social Protest by Upton Sinclair. Prior to that, the slogan, used as the title of a 1911 poem by James Oppenheim, had been attributed to åÔChicago Women Trade Unionists.åÕ It has also been attributed to socialist union organizer Rose Schneiderman. James Oppenheim claimed his seeing women strikers in Lawrence carrying a banner proclaiming åÒWe Want Bread and Roses TooåÓ inspired the poem, åÒBread and Roses.åÓ The poem, however, was written and published in 1911 prior to the strike. Later the poem was set to music by Caroline Kohlsaat and then by Mimi Farina. The song and slogan are now important parts of the labor movement and womenåÕs movement worldwide. This exhibition was made in collaboration with the Lawrence History Center and the University of Massachusetts Lowell History Department.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Building Vietnam War Scavenger Hunts through Web-Based Inquiry
Read the Fine Print
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Students research the effects of the Vietnam war on a specific group of people who were involved. They then create Internet scavenger hunts to share with the class.

Subject:
American History
Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
11/18/2020
Building the First Transcontinental Railroad
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

As the United States began the most deadly conflict in its history, the American Civil War, it was also laying the groundwork for one of its greatest achievements in transportation. The First Transcontinental Railroad, approved by Congress in the midst of war, helped connect the country in ways never before possible. Americans could travel from coast to coast with speed, changing how Americans lived, traded, and communicated while disrupting ways of life practiced for centuries by Native American populations. The coast-to-coast railroad was the result of the work of thousands of Americans, many of whom were Chinese immigrant laborers who worked under discriminatory pressures and for lower wages than their Irish counterparts. These laborers braved incredibly harsh conditions to lay thousands of miles of track. That trackåÑthe work of two railroad companies competing to lay the most miles from opposite directionsåÑcame together with the famous Golden Spike at Promontory Summit in Utah on May 10, 1869. This exhibition explores the construction of the first Transcontinental Railroad and its impact on American westward expansion. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLAåÕs Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Professor Krystyna Matusiak's course "Digital Libraries" in the Library and Information Science program at the University of Denver: Jenifer Fisher, Benjamin Hall, Nick Iwanicki, Cheyenne Jansdatter, Sarah McDonnell, Timothy Morris and Allan Van Hoye.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
05/01/2015
Burke Marshall
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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As an assistant attorney general in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, Burke Marshall played a key role in the federal government's efforts to desegregate the South. Representing the presidential administrations of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, Marshall mediated conflicts between civil rights protesters and southern white officials. In this interview, Marshall recalls the 1961 Freedom Rides and the 1962 desegregation of the University of Mississippi.

Subject:
American History
Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Date Added:
11/19/2020
The Buses Are Coming (Pt 1 of 4): Tuning in to the Civil Rights Movement
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students will use the CocoCast app to learn civics and social studies. These lessons are inspired by the San Diego Museum of African American Art’s 3-D exhibit titled “The Buses Are Coming” from August 2022. The lessons in this series will leverage augmented reality (AR) and use CocoCast, an app created by Three Space Lab, to be used on an iPad to allow learners to examine an artifact that would be otherwise inaccessible. The choice to employ AR will allow learners to experience the complexity of the emotions surrounding the bombing of the Freedom Ride bus in Anniston, Georgia. The lesson supports the development of oracy and literacy skills as students learn to evaluate historical events. NOTE: This lesson is part one of a four lesson sequence.

Estimated time required: 1 class period.

Technology required for this lesson: Augmented Reality, Internet Connectivity, Laptop/Desktop, Tablet or Smartphone.

Subject:
American History
English Language Arts
History
Social Studies
Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Verizon
Provider Set:
Verizon Innovative Learning HQ - Lessons and Apps
Author:
San Diego African American Museum of Fine Art
Date Added:
09/20/2023
The Buses Are Coming (Pt 2 of 4): Experiencing the Bus
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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In this lesson, students will use the CocoCast app to learn civics and social studies. These lessons are inspired by the San Diego Museum of African American Art’s 3-D exhibit titled “The Buses Are Coming” of August 2022. The lessons in this series will leverage augmented reality (AR) and use CocoCast, an app created by Three Space Lab to be used on the iPad, to allow learners to examine an artifact that would be otherwise inaccessible. The choice to employ AR will allow learners to experience the complexity of the emotions surrounding the bombing of the Freedom Ride bus in Anniston, Georgia. The lesson supports the development of oracy and literacy skills as students learn to evaluate historical events. NOTE: This lesson is part two of a four lesson sequence.
In Segment 2, learners will interact with the 3D model of the burning bus using CocoCast.

Estimated time required: 1 class period.

Technology required for this lesson: Augmented Reality, Internet Connectivity, Laptop/Desktop, Tablet or Smartphone.

Subject:
American History
English Language Arts
History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Verizon
Provider Set:
Verizon Innovative Learning HQ - Lessons and Apps
Author:
San Diego African American Museum of Fine Art
Date Added:
09/20/2023
The Buses Are Coming (Pt 3 of 4): What were the Freedom Rides?
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students will use the CocoCast app to learn civics and social studies. These lessons are inspired by the San Diego Museum of African American Fine Art's exhibit entitled, "TheBusesAreComing,”of August 2022. The lessons in this series will leverage augmented reality (AR) and use CocoCast, an app created by Three Space Lab to be used on the iPad, to allow learners to examine an artifact that would be otherwise inaccessible. The choice to employ AR will allow learners to experience the complexity of the emotions surrounding the bombing of the Freedom Ride bus in Anniston, Georgia. The lesson supports the development of oracy and literacy skills as students learn to evaluate historical events. NOTE: This lesson is part three of a four lesson sequence.

In Segment 3, learners will interact with the 3D model of the burning bus using CocoCast.

Estimated time required: 1 class period.

Technology required for this lesson: Augmented Reality, Internet Connectivity, Tablet or Smartphone.

Subject:
American History
English Language Arts
Geography
History
Social Studies
Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Verizon
Provider Set:
Verizon Innovative Learning HQ - Lessons and Apps
Author:
San Diego African American Museum of Fine Art
Date Added:
09/20/2023
The Buses Are Coming (Pt 4 of 4)
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students will use the CocoCast app to learn civics and social studies. These lessons are inspired by the San Diego Museum of African American Art’s 3-D exhibit titled “The Buses Are Coming” of August 2022. The lessons in this series will leverage augmented reality (AR) and use CocoCast, an app created by Three Space Lab to be used on the iPad, to allow learners to examine an artifact that would be otherwise inaccessible. The choice to employ AR will allow learners to experience the complexity of the emotions surrounding the bombing of the Freedom Ride bus in Anniston, Georgia. The lesson supports the development of oracy and literacy skills as students learn to evaluate historical events. NOTE: This lesson is part four of a four lesson sequence.

In Segment 4, learners will create an AR artifact and take action using social media.

Estimated time required: 1 class period.

Technology required for this lesson: .

Subject:
American History
English Language Arts
History
Social Studies
Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Verizon
Provider Set:
Verizon Innovative Learning HQ - Lessons and Apps
Author:
San Diego African American Museum of Fine Art
Date Added:
09/20/2023
Busing & Beyond: School Desegregation in Boston
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This collection uses primary sources to explore school desegregation in Boston. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Camp Sherman and the Mound City Earthworks: A Unique Story of Preservation
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Introduce students to Camp Sherman, the Mound City Earthworks, and the challenges of preservation.

Subject:
American History
Ohio in the United States
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Ohio History Connection
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
LaRue, Paul
Date Added:
05/18/2022
Cassatt's Breakfast in Bed
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This art history video discussion examines Mary Cassatt's "Breakfast In Bed," 1897 (Huntington Library).

Khan Academy learning modules include a Community space where users can ask questions and seek help from community members. Educators should consult with their Technology administrators to determine the use of Khan Academy learning modules in their classroom. Please review materials from external sites before sharing with students.

Subject:
American History
Arts
History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
11/17/2020
Cassatt's In the Loge
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This art history video discussion examines Mary Cassatt's "In the Loge," 1878, oil on canvas, 81.28 x 66.04 cm / 32 x 26 inches (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston).

Khan Academy learning modules include a Community space where users can ask questions and seek help from community members. Educators should consult with their Technology administrators to determine the use of Khan Academy learning modules in their classroom. Please review materials from external sites before sharing with students.

Subject:
American History
Arts
History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
11/17/2020
Cassatt's Woman with a Pearl Necklace in a Loge
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This art history video discussion examines Mary Cassatt's "Woman with a Pearl Necklace in a Loge," 1879, oil on canvas, 32 x 23-1/2 inches or 81.3 x 59.7 cm (Philadelphia Museum of Art).

Khan Academy learning modules include a Community space where users can ask questions and seek help from community members. Educators should consult with their Technology administrators to determine the use of Khan Academy learning modules in their classroom. Please review materials from external sites before sharing with students.

Subject:
American History
Arts
History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
11/17/2020
Children in Progressive-Era America
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

In twenty-first century American society, childhood is popularly understood as a time of innocence, learning, and play. At the end of the nineteenth century, however, children made up part of the countryåÕs workforce, and labored on farms and in factories. When they were not working, they enjoyed great independence in leisure activitiesåÑbe it in a loud city street or a peaceful country lake. Often, children were far from adult supervision. Reformers during the Progressive EråÑa period of social activism and political reform across the United States between the 1890s and 1920s åÑtook a great interest in child welfare. Through organizations and legislation, they sought to define what a happy and healthy childhood should be in the modern age. Immersion in nature was central to what the Progressives prescribed, and childrenåÕs organizations and camps offered a suitable combination of supervision and open spaces. The formula for a healthy childhood was further refined in postwar America. Children were given a distinct place in the family and home, as well as within the consumer market with the emergence of teenage culture and buying power. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA's Public Library Partnerships Project by collaborators from the Digital Library of Georgia and Georgia's public libraries.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Greer Martin
Date Added:
09/01/2015