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Application and Registration Certificate for for Fuel Oil Dealer or Supplier
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Basic Mileage Ration
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Social Studies
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Fuel Delivery Permit
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Gasoline Ration Card
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Latin American Revolutionaries
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore leaders of Latin American revolutions. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Social Studies
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Nonhighway Mileage Ration
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Pablo Picasso's Guernica and Modern War
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

First shown at the 1937 International Exposition in Paris, Guernica stands today as a universal statement against the horror of modern warfare. The painting was the response of the Spanish-born artist Pablo Picasso to the bombing of Guernica, a small Basque town in northern Spain that was destroyed on April 26, 1937, during the Spanish Civil War.

Subject:
Social Studies
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Commonwealth of Learning
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Commonwealth Certificate for Teacher ICT Integration
Author:
Virginia B. Spivey
Date Added:
02/11/2019
Processed Foods Ration Card for Residents of Border Zone in Mexico
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Rationing in World War II
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Sugar Allowance Coupon
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Sugar Purchase Certificate
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019
Treaty of Versailles and the End of World War I
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

On June 28, 1919, Germany and the Allied Powers signed the Treaty of Versailles in the Hall of Mirrors at the famous Palace of Versailles, officially ending World War I. World War I, or the Great War, lasted from 1914 to 1918, and claimed the lives of nearly ten million soldiers and approximately thirteen million civilians. Germany and its allies in the Central Powers had lost the war, so representatives of the victorious Allied Powers including the United States, France, and Britain negotiated the terms of the treaty. President Woodrow Wilson and his allies wanted the treaty to provide a lasting peace following Wilson‰Ûªs Fourteen Points speech delivered on January 8, 1918. European powers sought peace but also wanted to punish Germany, who they blamed for causing the war. Germans also expected that the Fourteen Points would be the basis for the peace talks when they signed the armistice in November 1918. When the Allied Powers met in Paris to discuss the world after the war, however, a much more punitive plan emerged.

Subject:
Social Studies
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Commonwealth of Learning
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Commonwealth Certificate for Teacher ICT Integration
Author:
Albert Robertson
Date Added:
02/11/2019
Victorian Era
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Queen Victoria of England reigned over a vast British empire from 1837 until her death in 1901. During her rule, England rapidly transformed into a modern, technologically-based economy exercising global military and cultural power, roiling with class and racial conflict. Victorianism extended far beyond the boundaries of Britain and informed international movements of the same period, including in the United States.

Subject:
Social Studies
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Commonwealth of Learning
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Commonwealth Certificate for Teacher ICT Integration
Author:
Tona Hangen,
Date Added:
02/11/2019
War Ration Book One
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

World War II ration memorabilia collection, 1942-1947.

The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply was established by Presidential Executive Order 8734 on April 11, 1941, in an effort to control inflation. The civilian supply function of the agency was transferred to the Office of Production Management in August of 1941 and the name was shortened to the Office of Price Administration (OPA). The Emergency Price Control Act (January 30, 1942) established the purposes of the agency as follows: to stabilize prices and rents and prevent unwarranted increases in them; to prevent profiteering, hoarding and speculation; to assure that defense appropriations were not dissipated by excessive prices; to protect those with fixed incomes from undue impairment of their living standards; to assist in securing adequate production; and to prevent a post-emergency collapse of values." The OPA fixed price ceilings on all commodities except farm products and controlled rents in defense areas. The first rationing program, for automobile tires, was initiated December 27, 1941. There were two types of rationing programs. The first was a certificate program, where an applicant had to meet eligibility standards and show need to a local ration board before receiving a certificate permitting purchase of the rationed item. This type of program was applied to ties, automobiles, typewriters, bicycles, rubber footwear and stoves. The second program was a coupon or stamp type for which all civilians were eligible. These programs were administered through local banks and covered foods, fuel oil, gasoline and shoes. Rationing continued throughout World War II and by the end of November 1945 only the sugar and rubber tire rationing programs remained. Tire rationing ceased on December 31, 1945. Sugar rationing continued until June 11, 1947. The Office of Price Administration was dissolved April 1, 1947.

Subject:
Government and Public Administration
American Government
American History
Government
History
Modern World History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
State Library of Ohio
Provider Set:
Ohio Memory
Author:
United States Office of Price Administration
Date Added:
01/31/2019