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  • News Literacy Project
Checkology: Arguments & Evidence
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Educational Use
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You experience the information aftermath of a fictional event as it unfolds on social media, learn about five common logical fallacies, then evaluate the evidence in several arguments.

Learning objectives
-I can differentiate between claims supported by actual evidence and sound reasoning and those which rely on faulty or inauthentic “evidence” and logical fallacies.
-I can determine the overall strength of an argument.

Essential questions
-What is the role of evidence in opinion and editorial writing?
-In what ways can logical fallacies mislead an audience or distort a position?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Be Health Informed
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Educational Use
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Discover how to make sense of the health and wellness information vying for our attention — and avoid being misled.

Learning objectives
-I can evaluate health and wellness information.
-I can explain why people are vulnerable to health misinformation.
-I can list key characteristics of quality health information.
-I can describe common red flags to watch out for when encountering health misinformation.

Essential questions
-When can you trust health and wellness information?
-Why are we vulnerable to health misinformation?
-What are some characteristics of quality health information?
-What are some common patterns of faulty health information?
-How can we combat health misinformation?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Be the Editor
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Educational Use
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Test your news judgment by selecting the most newsworthy stories to feature on the homepage of your news site, then explain your choices.

Learning objectives
-I can apply and extend my news judgment skills by comparing the newsworthiness of a group of dissimilar news stories and support and defend my choices.

Essential questions
-How should news organizations decide which news reports to feature as the top stories of the day?
-What are the general criteria news organizations use to determine which stories to feature more prominently than others?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Branded Content
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Educational Use
Rating
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Learn the relationship among advertisers, the news media and the public to understand the rise of branded content and debate the ethical implications of new forms of marketing.

Learning objectives
-I can identify advertising content that has been labeled in some way and explain how it differs from traditional advertising.
-I can describe some of the major factors that have influenced the development of such packaging, including why it’s desirable for marketers and difficult for news organizations.

Essential questions
-Why do news organizations sell advertisements?
-How is branded content different from traditional advertising?
-Do you think it is important for people to know when they’re encountering an advertisement?
-Does a news organization’s sale of advertising space compromise the quality of the journalism it produces?
-How should news organizations manage their relationship with advertisers to make sure that advertising clients do not influence news coverage?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Citizen Watchdogs
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Educational Use
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Learn the ways that ordinary people can document and expose wrongdoing, including monitoring news coverage for breaches of journalism standards, by examining a series of case studies.

Learning objectives
-I can name several ways that ordinary people can play a watchdog role.
-I can explain the details of four citizen watchdog case studies.
-I can describe the relationship between citizen watchdogs and journalists.

Essential questions
-How can ordinary people play the watchdog role?
-How do citizen watchdogs and journalists interact with one another?
-How are personal technology, social media and citizen watchdogs connected?
-What issues or subjects are most in need of citizen watchdogs today?
-Do particular issues or subjects lend themselves to citizen watchdogs? Are there some that do not?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Conspiratorial Thinking
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Educational Use
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Learn to recognize conspiracy theories and explain what makes people vulnerable to conspiratorial thinking.

Learning objectives
-I can explain what “conspiracy theories” are and why people find them appealing and compelling.
-I can recognize the key cognitive biases involved in conspiratorial thinking and identify the human needs that conspiracy theories address.
-I can describe what conspiratorial thinking is and the role it plays in making conspiracy theories engaging and compelling to people.
-I can demonstrate the social and political impact of conspiratorial thinking and conspiracy theories.

Essential questions
-What is a conspiracy theory? What makes conspiracy theories unique compared to other kinds of misinformation?
-How can conspiracy theories seem so compelling despite lacking evidence for their claims?
-What tricks does conspiratorial thinking play on our brains? What makes people vulnerable to conspiratorial thinking?
-Do conspiracy theories have real-world consequences? Can they be dangerous?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Democracy’s Watchdog
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Educational Use
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Learn about the historic watchdog role that a free press has played in the United States by exploring a collection of investigative reports spanning more than a century.

Learning objectives
-I can explore five iconic examples of investigative journalism and determine the impact of each.
-I can explain the “watchdog role” of the press and describe its importance.

Essential questions
-In what ways can a free press act like a watchdog on behalf of the public?
-What are some of the most important examples of watchdog journalism in American history?
-In what ways can investigative journalism bring about social or political change?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Evaluating Science-Based Claims
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Educational Use
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Learn how to recognize science-based claims and assess their credibility; explore why people resist and deny science; and gain the skills to evaluate science journalism.

Learning objectives
-I can differentiate between science-based claims and nonscience claims.
-I can explain why science is never 100% certain about anything and why this is one of its strengths.
-I can differentiate between a scientific hypothesis and a scientific theory.
-I can explain what makes people vulnerable to pseudoscience and why some people doubt, resist and deny the scientific consensus about some topics.
-I can evaluate science-based claims using plausibility judgments, evidence and the scientific consensus.
-I can recognize common problems with science news coverage.

Essential questions
-How can people know which science-based claims are worthy of acceptance?
-What is science? Why is it a reliable way of knowing things about the natural world?
-What makes people doubt or resist science? Or What makes science misinformation seem “right”?
-How should I decide which claims and pieces of information about science topics to trust?
-Why do people sometimes believe hypotheses that are not supported by evidence?
-How do scientists attempt to identify real associations/causes without falling for false associations/causes?
-Can scientists ever avoid error entirely?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Harm & Distrust
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Educational Use
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Learn about the historical failure of mainstream news organizations to serve all people equally, the legacies of distrust this has caused among specific groups in America — particularly Black Americans — and recent efforts by news outlets to improve their coverage.

Learning objectives
-I can summarize the role journalism aspires to play in American democracy.
-I can explain why news coverage that fails to fairly and accurately reflect the experiences and realities of all communities and groups of people falls short of the standards of quality journalism.
-I can explain why it’s important for communities to be able to trust news organizations to tell their stories accurately.
-I can list historical examples of legacy media failing to live up to its duty to minimize harm in relation to Black communities in the U.S.
-I can explain why many Black Americans distrust legacy media and can apply this understanding to coverage of other groups of historically marginalized people.
-I can summarize the essential role the Black press played in countering biased and racist narratives during Reconstruction and beyond.
-I can recognize examples of overt racial bias in contemporary news coverage.
-I can describe the watchdog role I can play in advocating for changes to make newsrooms more equitable and representative of the communities they serve.

Essential questions
-In what ways does journalism require public trust? What are some things that can damage the public’s trust in news organizations?
-How can the ethics and standards of quality journalism work to prevent harmful coverage of marginalized communities and groups?
-In what ways have news organizations fallen short of these standards? How has coverage from legacy news media caused harm to and distrust from marginalized communities, particularly the Black community?
-How has the lack of diversity in America’s newsrooms perpetuated bias in some coverage of Black communities in the U.S.? How has this impacted Black Americans?
-What are some common forms that racial bias can take in news coverage?
-When news organizations publish apologies for their historic racist coverage, is it a meaningful way to rebuild trust?
-Should news organizations be transparent about the demographics of their reporting staff and management?
-What are some new approaches to journalism that can promote better and more equitable coverage of issues impacting BIPOC communities, and rebuild trust?
-What actions could you take to advocate for changes to make newsrooms more equitable and representative of the communities they serve?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: InfoZones
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Educational Use
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Learn to determine the credibility of a piece of information by identifying its primary purpose or “InfoZone”: news, opinion, entertainment, advertising, propaganda and raw information.

Learning objectives
-I can analyze examples of information and categorize them by determining their primary purpose.

Essential questions
-Why is it important to know the primary purpose of the information we encounter?
-Do some pieces of information have more than one purpose? Can a primary, or main, purpose still be identified for these?
-Does the purpose of a piece of information affect its credibility?
-What does it mean for information to be verified?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Introduction to Algorithms
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Educational Use
Rating
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Interact with a mock social media site and search engine to understand the information that algorithms gather about you to personalize what you see online.

Learning objectives
-I can explain how algorithms use data to personalize information for individuals.
-I can describe the advantages and disadvantages of this technology.

Essential questions
-Why is the information found through search engines and on social media platforms different for different people?
-What are some of the ways that algorithms personalize information for us online?
-Why do search engines and social media platforms use algorithms?
-How do major “ad-tech” companies use algorithms to make more money?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Making Sense of Data
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Educational Use
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Explore how we create, interact with, and are influenced by data in all aspects of our lives — and learn how to evaluate the accuracy of data-based claims and visualizations.

Learning objectives
-I can explain why data isn’t objective or infallible.
-I can differentiate between credible and questionable sources of data.
-I can explain some of the primary ways data can be distorted in misleading ways.
-I can interpret different ways data is presented.
-I can identify charts and other data visualizations that are misleading and explain why.

Essential questions
-What is data?
-When can you trust data?
-Can data ever be objective?
-Who collects data and for what purposes?
-How can people use and misuse data?
-How can we tell when data is reliable?
-What are some common problems in the ways people represent and communicate data?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Misinformation
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Educational Use
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Learn to understand different types of misinformation and the ways that misinformation can damage democracy.

Learning objectives
-I can identify and differentiate between different types of misinformation.
-I can explain why understanding and debunking misinformation matters.
-I can evaluate and explain the possible consequences of misinformation.
-I can understand the role of Russian disinformation during and after the 2016 presidential election.

Essential questions
-What makes some pieces of information “go viral”?
-What makes rumors spread?
-What emotions do rumors provoke in people?
-What are some of the reasons people share false information?
-Is all misinformation bad or damaging? Why or why not?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Power in Art: The Watchdog Role of Editorial Cartoonists
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Educational Use
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Learn about the history of editorial cartooning as a unique and powerful form of opinion journalism and practice analyzing cartoons from the 1700s to the present day.

Learning objectives
-I can identify the primary elements of an editorial cartoon and explain how they work together to express an opinion.
-I can summarize how editorial cartoons have held people in power accountable.
-I can distinguish between functional and harmful representations of groups in political cartoons.
-I can analyze and interpret an editorial cartoon.
-I can describe why diverse voices and perspectives are important in editorial cartooning.
-I can explain how modern forms of graphic political expression compare with editorial cartoons.

Essential questions
-What makes political cartoons an effective and powerful form of expression? Why do they elicit strong responses, including from those in power?
-What can a cartoon do or express that text cannot? What can a cartoon/drawing express that a photo cannot?
-Are memes modern-day editorial cartoons — or are they different?
-How can graphic political expression influence civic discourse and engagement?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Practicing Quality Journalism
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Educational Use
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Learn the standards of quality journalism by playing the role of reporter in a game-like simulation of a breaking news event.

Learning objectives
-I can list and explain seven major standards of quality journalism.
-I can apply those standards to differentiate between a credible news report and an unreliable news report.

Essential questions
-How is news journalism different from opinion journalism?
-What rules and guidelines should journalists abide by when reporting a story, and why?
-What is required to make a piece of information credible?
-How do aspiring to the standards of quality journalism help journalists minimize bias and produce credible news coverage?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Press Freedoms Around the World
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Educational Use
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Explore the state of press freedoms in 22 nations, including videos of journalists in 10 countries recounting their reporting experiences.

Learning objectives
-I can explain what press freedom is and compare the ways that different countries protect — or restrict — it.
-I can synthesize information from watchdog organizations that track how journalists are treated in different countries to create a profile for the press freedom level of a specific country.

Essential questions
-What are some significant ways that press freedoms can be protected or restricted?
-How can journalists in a country with legal or constitutional protections of press freedoms still experience restrictions or limitations on their work?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: The First Amendment
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Educational Use
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Learn why the First Amendment’s five rights and freedoms are so vital to American democracy. Through case studies, weigh in on Supreme Court decisions in which these protections were challenged.

Learning objectives
-I can name the five freedoms protected by the First Amendment.
-I can explore and analyze six landmark First Amendment cases, judge them myself and defend or criticize the Supreme Court’s decision in each.

Essential questions
-What five freedoms are protected by the First Amendment?
-How do the five freedoms work together to strengthen American democracy?
-In what ways are the freedoms dependent on one another? How do they support, protect and enhance each other?
-What court cases have been most influential in shaping press protections and individuals’ rights to free expression under the First Amendment?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: Understanding Bias
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Educational Use
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Understand news media bias by learning about five types of bias and five ways it can manifest itself, as well as methods for minimizing it.

Learning objectives
-I can explain how bias in news coverage is a complex issue.
-I can discuss the role people’s own biases play in perceptions of bias in media.
-I can recognize five types of bias (partisan, demographic, corporate, “big story,” and neutrality) and five forms (framing, absence of fairness and balance, tone, story selection, and sourcing) these biases can take in news coverage.

Essential questions
-Is it possible for a piece of information to be completely unbiased or objective?
-Are there degrees of bias?
-Most people know about political or “partisan” bias. What are some other kinds of biases people have?
-How do biases show themselves in news coverage?
-Do our own biases affect the way that we perceive news coverage?
-What can journalists and other creators of information do to minimize the influence of their personal biases? How can the standards of quality journalism help them do this?
-Why is it important to understand the differences between opinion journalism and straight news journalism before discussing bias?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
Checkology: What Is News?
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Educational Use
Rating
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Explore how journalists “filter” information, or determine which events and issues to cover in a given news cycle, by using key criteria.

Learning objectives
-I can explain what newsworthiness is and name the four major factors that determine it.
-I can develop my own sense of news judgment by evaluating the newsworthiness of a series of examples.

Essential questions
-What does it mean for an issue or an event to be “newsworthy”?
-What makes an issue or event “news”? Who decides?
-What factors should be used to determine which issues and events get covered by journalists?

*A free teacher account is necessary to view this Checkology content.

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Provider Set:
Checkology
Date Added:
01/30/2024
News Literacy Project: 6 things to know about AI
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Educational Use
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Artificial intelligence technology is not new, but dramatic advances in generative AI have captured the world’s attention and are transforming the information landscape.

This infographic provides an overview of how this technology works and offers six news literacy takeaways to keep in mind as these tools evolve...

Subject:
21st Century Skills
Critical Thinking
Information, Media and Technological Literacy
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
News Literacy Project
Date Added:
01/30/2024