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100 Free Web Tools for Elementary Teachers
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This article includes the URL and description of 100 free web tools that can be used by all teachers. The tools are categorized into search engines, math and science, games, templates and lesson plans, and more.

Subject:
Practitioner Support
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
John Costilla
Date Added:
02/09/2021
7.2.3 Spread the Message: How to Respond to Epidemics
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In Unit 3, students work in triads to create a podcast about a social or medical epidemic that concerns them or their community. Over the course of the unit, students will choose an epidemic topic, conduct research, write a script for their podcast, and use technology to record and sound edit their podcast. Students begin creating this podcast by listening to an exemplar podcast and reading a model podcast script. Students analyze what makes these model podcasts strong and build a criteria for success from their observations. Students then begin researching to gather information for their podcast, participating in a series of mini-lessons as needed to review research skills learned in Module 1, such as refining research questions, creating a research note-catcher, generating search terms, and evaluating the relevance and credibility of sources. Additionally, students consider how individuals, events, and ideas in their epidemic interact as they research. For students who may wish to research the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a chapter in Patient Zero that will support this research, as well as a lot of information available online. Encourage students who wish to research this topic to be sensitive to other students in the class who may have lost friends or family members in the pandemic or were significantly impacted in other ways. For the mid-unit assessment, students first read an article and answer questions to analyze the interaction of individuals, events, and ideas in a text. In the second part of the mid-unit assessment, students then conduct their own research to answer a question prompted by the article read in the first part of the assessment.

In the second half of Unit 3, students work in their triads to plan, write, and create their podcast. First each member of the triad drafts a narrative lead, being sure to include narrative elements such as a hook, characters, and the important events of the epidemic. Then triads spend time combining and refining these narratives into one strong lead for their podcast script, being sure to include narrative techniques such as dialogue, pacing, and description. Students then divide the rest of the script-writing among the members of their triad to write the remaining three sections of the script: the social and scientific ideas, the tools/mindsets/habits of character, and the message or lessons learned. Based on peer feedback from a tuning protocol, students revise their script to present their research findings in a coherent and engaging manner, using formal English when appropriate and eliminating wordiness and redundancy when necessary. Students also practice presenting their scripts in their triads and then for another triad of classmates to receive feedback on their presentation skills of adequate volume and clarity. For their end of unit assessment, students present their script to their classmates, focusing on all the skills they practiced and tuned throughout the unit: coherence and organization of information, volume, clarity, and formal, conventional English. During the performance task lessons, students turn their podcast presentations into actual podcast recordings with music and sound effects. Students must learn and use sound-editing skills as well as collaboration within and across triads to produce a high-quality podcast to publish for their classmates, community, or even the world by posting it online.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
05/17/2024
7.3.1 Collaboration in the Harlem Renaissance
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Students begin the unit exploring collaboration in the Harlem Renaissance, noting how the Harlem Renaissance was an explosion and confluence of art, music, and literature. Throughout the first half of the unit, students explore literary texts, and the art and music they inspired, to develop their ability to compare and contrast these versions and analyze the effects of techniques unique to each medium and note thematic connections. First, students examine scenes and songs from the iconic Broadway musical Shuffle Along. They experience this celebratory text, which transformed American musical theater and was created through the collaboration of Eubie Blake, Noble Sissle, F. E. Miller, and Aubrey Lyles. Students analyze the text’s literary techniques, including figurative language such as allusion and metaphor. Next, students analyze the songs’ musical techniques—volume, tone, and tempo—noting how the musical and textual techniques affect meaning and develop themes such as love persevering through tough times. For the mid-unit assessment, students examine the thematic connections between the poem “Lift Every Voice and Sing” by James Weldon Johnson and the song and sculpture inspired by the text. Students compare the different versions, analyzing the effects of the techniques unique to each medium and how they develop themes around how black Americans collaborate to survive, thrive, and create art.

In the second half of the unit, students continue exploring Harlem Renaissance literature by analyzing poems that develop themes about drawing strength from the past and persevering to achieve dreams. First, students analyze “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” by Langston Hughes, learning how the structure and figurative language develops themes about black Americans connecting to and drawing strength from their African roots. Next, students analyze the poems “Calling Dreams” and “Hope” by Georgia Douglas Johnson, noting how she uses more formal structures and figurative language to develop themes about black Americans achieving their goals despite great obstacles. For the end of unit assessment, student learning is assessed with selected and constructed response questions about the structure, language, and themes in Claude McKay’s “I Shall Return.” Finally, students compare McKay’s poem to artwork by Meta Warrick Fuller and Winold Reiss for thematic connections around drawing strength from and longing for home or Africa. The unit concludes with a collaborative discussion about how all the poems and artwork examined in the unit relate thematically.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
05/17/2024
7.3.2 The Context of the Harlem Renaissance
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Students launch the second unit with a Build Background Knowledge protocol, reading short informational texts and examining visual art to further develop their sense of the social and political context of the Harlem Renaissance. They explore the context of the Harlem Renaissance, noting how the Harlem Renaissance occurred during the Great Migration, Jim Crow laws, and the racial violence of post-Civil War America. Students read two short stories, “His Motto” by Lottie Burrell Dixon and “The Boy and the Bayonet” by Paul Laurence Dunbar. Students explore character, plot, setting, theme, language, and point of view in these short stories. Additionally, students discuss how both stories develop themes about working hard to achieve dreams and how community helps to bring out our best selves. For the mid-unit assessment, students examine the third part of “The Boy and the Bayonet” for how particular elements of a story interact and how the author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters.

In the second half of the unit, students continue to explore the context of the Harlem Renaissance by analyzing how the theme of looking to the past for strength and hope connects examples of its artwork and text. Students begin this work by examining a model literary argument essay, discussing how three pieces of work from the Harlem Renaissance are connected by this theme. Next, students study the introduction, Proof Paragraphs, and conclusion of the model literary argument essay as they work collaboratively to plan and write their own pair literary argument essay. This pair essay explores the theme of how collaboration and community bring out the best in people. In the end of unit assessment, students independently write their own literary argument essay about how three works from the Harlem Renaissance are connected by the theme of dreams giving life meaning and purpose.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
05/17/2024
7.3 The Harlem Renaissance
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Can we “find fuel for the future in the past”? Poet Nikki Grimes asks this question in her poem “Emergency Measures,” the first in her collection One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance. As Grimes does in her book, students will spend the module pondering the wisdom from works created during the Harlem Renaissance. First students will explore scenes and songs from a play, poems, and artwork to experience the explosion of creativity and ideas of collaboration and innovation. Then students examine political artwork and cartoons, informative articles, and short stories to explore the social and political context of the Harlem Renaissance. Finally, students explore the legacy of the Harlem Renaissance, turning back to Nikki Grimes and her collection of poems crafted with lines from Harlem Renaissance poets. Students consider whether they and contemporary writers, singers, and musicians truly can “find fuel for the future in the past.”

In Unit 1, students explore collaboration in the Harlem Renaissance, noting how the Harlem Renaissance was an explosion and confluence of art, music, and literature. Students first examine scenes and songs from the Broadway musical Shuffle Along, experiencing this celebratory text that transformed American musical theater and was created through the collaboration of Eubie Blake, Noble Sissle, F. E. Miller, and Aubrey Lyles. Students analyze how the musical and textual techniques in the play affect meaning and develop themes such as love persevering through tough times. Similarly, students explore the thematic connections of triumph over hardships in the poem “Lift Every Voice and Sing” by James Weldon Johnson and the song and sculpture inspired by the text. Students then analyze iconic poems such as “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” by Langston Hughes, “Calling Dreams” and “Hope” by Georgia Douglas Johnson, and Claude McKay’s “I Shall Return.” In each of these poems, students analyze the structure, figurative language, and themes such as drawing strength from the past and overcoming adversity to fulfill one’s dreams. Students conclude their exploration of collaboration and cultural confluence in a collaborative discussion comparing McKay’s poem to artwork by Meta Warrick Fuller and Winold Reiss for thematic connections around drawing strength from and longing for home or Africa.

In Unit 2, students explore the social and political context of the Harlem Renaissance by reading short informational texts and examining visual art. Students learn how the Harlem Renaissance occurred during the era of the Great Migration, Jim Crow laws, and the racial violence of post-Civil War America. They then read two short stories, “His Motto” by Lottie Burrell Dixon and “The Boy and the Bayonet” by Paul Laurence Dunbar, analyzing point of view and the interactions between story elements, such as character, plot, and setting. Additionally, students discuss how both stories develop themes about working hard to achieve dreams and how community helps to bring out our best selves. Students continue their exploration of the Harlem Renaissance context by engaging with literary argument writing. Students examine a model literary argument essay then write pair and independent essays, discussing how three pieces of work from the Harlem Renaissance are connected by themes such as looking to the past for strength, collaboration and community to bring out one’s best self, and dreams giving life meaning and purpose.

In Unit 3, students explore the contemporary legacy of the Harlem Renaissance by examining short informational and literary texts, visual art, and performances to further develop their sense of how the Harlem Renaissance continues to impact us today. To develop their background knowledge about this legacy, students analyze Nikki Grimes’ poem “Emergency Measures,” original artwork associated with the poem, and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s ballet, “Uptown,” which was inspired by the people, places, art, music, and writing of the Harlem Renaissance. Then students study several of Nikki Grimes’ poems in conjunction with the poetry of the Harlem Renaissance, learning how Grimes uses lines from poets such as Langston Hughes and Georgia Douglas Johnson to create her own poems which develop themes similar to those of the Harlem Renaissance but in a contemporary context. Students continue their exploration of the legacy of the Harlem Renaissance by creating a museum exhibit, which includes three pieces from the Harlem Renaissance and one contemporary piece that they have studied or created themselves. Students write a curator’s statement explaining how the works are connected by theme and create labels discussing the details of structure, language, and theme in each piece. Students practice and revise the presentation of their curator’s statements and labels preparing for the Harlem Renaissance museum, in which students contribute to making a better world by sharing these important works with their community.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
EL Education
Date Added:
05/17/2024
Art Pals: Donkey Hodie
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Educational Use
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Donkey Hodie and her pals are making art projects from materials found around Someplace Else. As they play and create their art projects, children practice collaboration, cooperation and perspective-taking. In the classroom, teachers can lead a discussion on collaboration.

Subject:
Arts
Material Type:
Game
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Date Added:
11/06/2023
Arthur: Bowling
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Educational Use
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Through this fun bowling activity, children hone counting and gross motor skills. They also explore how to respond if they spill something.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Date Added:
11/06/2023
ArtsNow Learning: My Sound Is the Best! [PDF]
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students will use music as an impetus for stating and supporting opinions. They will compose an opinion poster based on a narrative about a train using percussion instruments. This will involve group work which can lead the students to write individual pieces in which they support their opinions using descriptive words.

Subject:
Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ArtsNow
Date Added:
10/01/2022
Back to School: Activity Starters: Xavier Riddle and the Secret Museum
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Educational Use
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Be deliberate when inviting your student to watch a PBS KIDS show. These resources can help by adding meaningful conversation and easy activities to their experience watching Xavier Riddle and the Secret Museum.

Subject:
Health and Physical Education
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Date Added:
11/06/2023
BetterLesson: Speaking and Listening: Collaborative Conversations
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Educational Use
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Students will partner read The Kite, by Alma Flor Ada. Then work together in small collaborative groups to describe the character of the mother, the children, or the kitten. Included in this lesson are video demonstrations, printable character cards, and printable character maps.

Subject:
Arts
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
BetterLesson
Date Added:
12/01/2022
Bringing the Universe to America's Classroom: Collection
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Engage K-12 students with phenomena and science practices using this collection of supplementary digital media resources created by GBH in collaboration with NASA. The resources align with key NGSS Earth, space, and physical science disciplinary core ideas. To ensure that science content is accessible for all students, supports are included for students with disabilities or who are English learners; many resources have Spanish translations.

Subject:
Mathematics
Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Date Added:
01/01/2022
Building a Collaborative Data Culture
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Educational Use
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Eliminate data silos and explore data planning tools while promoting diversity of perspectives and encouraging collaboration. Teachers will examine collaborative structures that foster a healthy culture around data, data collection and the presentation of data to stakeholders. Teachers will define what a collaborative data culture looks like in their classrooms and in their schools.

Approximate time to complete this course is 3 hours. A micro-credential is available from Digital Promise upon completion.

Subject:
Leadership
Practitioner Support
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Verizon
Provider Set:
Verizon Innovative Learning HQ - Professional Development
Author:
Digital Promise
Date Added:
09/21/2023
CIESE: Collaborative Projects
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Educational Use
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Using a variety of science topics, these projects link your class with classes around the world in data collection and analysis. There are projects recommended for all grade levels. Begin dates and end dates are listed to help in planning for the school year.

Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Center for Innovation in Engineering and Science Education
Date Added:
08/07/2023
Classroom Cell Phone Policy
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The goal of this lesson is to give students ownership over classroom policies by asking them to research and support a cell phone policy that they believe should be used in our classroom. Students will discuss and debate the policy after researching and then they will create the policy that we will follow for the first quarter. After the first quarter, we will reevaluate the policy for effectiveness. Students will use research and speaking and listening standards to complete this PBL for an authentic purpose. It is important to actually implement the policy for that particular class, or students will not feel the 

Subject:
Critical Thinking
Interdisciplinary, Project-based, and Real-World Learning
Personal Management
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Margaret Delgado-Chernick
Date Added:
07/15/2019